Feudalism webquest

Feudalism Webquest

Introduction
Task
Process
Resources
Evaluation
Conclusion

Introduction

Three elements existed and characterize Feudalism: lords, vassals and fiefs. Feudalism is defined by how these three elements fit together. A lord was a noble who owned land. A vassal was given land by the lord. The land was known as a fief. In exchange for the fief, the vassal would provide military service to the lord. The obligations and relations between lord, vassal and fief lies at the heart of feudalism.

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Your Task

Students will work with a partner to do the following:
1. Research an aspect of society common to both feudal Japan and Medieval Europe.
(see list below)

2. Provide a cogent thesis statement. Analyze why certain aspects of feudalism in Japan and Europe were similar or disimilar. Compare to modern life in the United States.

3. Create a display that includes elements required for History Day with information and visuals to present your findings. These displays will be judged by visitors to the fair who will use rubrics (below) to assiss the quality of the product.

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The Process

Choose one of the following topics:

1. Economic system/money
What it is worth
Who has it
What is it spent on
How is it seen
How does trade relate to it
Land (who owns it, who works it)
2. Arts & Literature
Calligraphy
Tapestries
Music
Painting
Theater
3. Warriors
Who were they
What was their purpose
Who/what controlled them
Code of conduct
Daily life
Status
4. Peasants
Who were they
What was their purpose
Who/what controlled them
Daily life
Status
5. Merchants/Tradesmen
Who were they
What was their purpose
Who/what controlled them
Status
6. Aristocracy
Who were they
What was their purpose
Who/what controlled them
Daily life
Status
7. Architecture
Available materials
Major types/uses
Form/Function
Innovations
8. Differing Experiences
By Women
By Children
Stranger/Traveler
9. Living Conditions
Food
Entertainment
Hygiene/Health
Education
Literacy
10. Technology
Major Developments
Important theories
Personages
Achievements
11. Religion/Beliefs
Ethos/Rules
Attitudes
Death
Influence over society
12. Fashions
Satorial Laws
Textiles
Hair
Jewelry
Perfumes
Make-up
13. Religious Communities
Who were they
What was their purpose
Who/what controlled them
Daily life
14. Kingdoms & Empires
Famous Battles
Famous Political figures
Rise and fall

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Feudalism Resources

Feudal Japan

WS University: Ancient Japan

Japan Guide.Com

Open History:Japan

Guide to Kamakura era of Japan

Maricopa University: Feudalism Comparison

Feudal Europe

History Learning Site: Medieval England

University of Calgary: Feudalism

Metropolitan Museum: Knights and Feudalism

History Guide: Feudalism

Fordham University: Internet Medieval Sourcebook

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Evaluation

Feudal Fair Rubric
Judging Criteria
Superior
5
Excellent
4
Good
3
Modifier
Score
Historical
Accuracy
Exhibit has a clear thesis (main idea or point of view). Main ideas are supported by facts, which are supported by evidence (primary sources).
The thesis is not clearly stated. Main ideas are supported by facts, but exhibit would be improved with more evidence.
Exhibit has no clear thesis and raises questions about the accuracy of facts, or facts seem correct but need to be supported with more evidence.
x6
Out of 30
Analysis and
Interpretation
The thesis is supported by thoughtful analysis and interpretation of how and why the two societies were alike/different.
Exhibit includes more description of the two societies than analysis or interpretation of their commonalities/ differences.
Exhibit only describes people or events and does not offer analysis or interpretation of their commonalities/ differences.
x6
Out of 30
Research
Varied sources (at least 3 primary and 3 secondary) are used to support the exhibit's thesis and analysis. Interpretation and conclusions are based on solid research. Includes Works Cited.
Some variety of sources (at least 2 primary and 3 secondary) is used, but interpretation and conclusions could be enriched by using more sources. Includes Works Cited.
The sources are not diverse(at least 1 primary and 3 secondary) and their relation to the thesis is not clear. Conclusion is implied, not stated. Includes Works Cited.
x4
Out of 30
Written
Material
Exhibit is well organized with the title, section divisions and a main message that is clear and easy to recognize. All supplemental material is clearly captioned and enhances the message of the exhibit.
Exhibit is neat and includes section divisions and a main message, but they are a little hard to find initially. The exhibit could be improved by using clearer captions that relate to the message.
Exhibit shows evidence of organization but section divisions and main message need to be clearer and easier to recognize.Written material may contain some errors. Labels and captions do not enhance the message or fit exhibit.
x2
Out of 30
Exhibit
Exhibit is visually effective and utilizes images and artifacts (such as maps, photos, models) to communicate central points. The photographs, images and supplemental information are appropriate in terms of content and location. The overall appearance is pleasing.
Exhibit utilizes visual desplay but relies on text more than visual to communicate central points. The exhibit could be improved by focused or fewer images and supplemental information.
Exhibit utilizes visual display and text but images do not always communicate central points. Exhibit may be cluttered or sparse and in great need of greater visual impact.
x2
Out of 30

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Conclusion

The feudal system was a precursor of capitalism that flourished in both Europe and Japan. It stabilized society during a time of constant threat from barbarian invasions and consolidated small groups of people into a larger political and cultural group.

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